Tag Archives: Museum of Modern Art

Filmmaker in Focus: Euzhan Palcy May 18–30, 2011

The Museum of Modern Art will feature the films of Euzhan Palcy during the month of May.

Palcy (b. Martinique, 1958), who in 1989 became the first black woman director to have her work produced by a major Hollywood studio (with MGM’s A Dry White Season), explores themes of race, gender, and politics from a decidedly feminist perspective. This first U.S. retrospective of Palcy’s work includes a newly restored print of her Rue Cases-Nègres (Sugar Cane Alley), which won a Silver Lion award at the 1983 Venice Film Festival, along with the New York premieres of Les Mariées de I’isles Bourbon (2007), an historical epic about forced marriage in 17th-century France; Parcours de Dissident (2006), about the forgotten history of West Indian patriots during World War II; Siméon (1992), a musical comedy fairytale set in the Caribbean; and the biographical documentary Aime Cesaire, A Voice for History (1994). The series also features A Dry White Season (1989), a key film on South African apartheid; and the made-for-television productions Ruby Bridges (1998), about segregation in New Orleans from the perspective of a young child; and The Killing Yard (2001), which explores events surrounding the 1971 Attica prison uprising. Miss Palcy and special guests will introduce a number of programs in the series.

Click here for a schedule of screenings at the MoMA


Organized by Ron Magliozzi, Assistant Curator, and Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

The exhibition is made possible by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

 


Charles Burnett: The Power to Endure April 6–25, 2011

The Museum of Modern Art will feature the films of Charles Burnett throughout the month of April.

Burnett has long borne the dubious distinction of being, as critic Armond White observed, “the least well-known great American filmmaker.” In Charles Burnett: Interviews (University Press of Mississippi, 2011), Burnett cites the phrase “the power to endure” as a motif his films share with William Faulkner’s novels; the phrase applies equally well to the indomitable characters who inhabit Burnett’s cinema, and to Burnett’s own struggle to get his films made in accordance with his vision.

Each of Burnett’s films can be seen to chronicle some aspect of the black experience in America, offering black and white audiences alike a moving representation and triumphant appreciation of African American culture, with a strong emphasis on both the rewards and burdens of family. It should be evident from the films presented inthis retrospective that Burnett is a talent deserving of a much larger audience.

Click here for a schedule of film screenings at the MoMA.

Charles Burnett on the set of The Glass Shield. 1994.
USA. Written and directed by Charles Burnett
Organized by Charles Silver, Curator, Department of Film, and Professor Robert Kapsis, Department of Sociology and Film Studies, Queens College (CUNY). Special thanks to Charles Burnett, Cinema Libre, Milestone Films, UCLA Film & Television Archive, Carolyn Schroeder, Dai Sil Kim-Gibson, Kathy Coblentz, Paul Alan Smith, Sony Pictures, Showtime, Miramax, The Hallmark Channel, The Walt Disney Company, American Sterling, Billy Woodberry, Dennis Doros and Amy Heller, California Newsreel, Vulcan productions, ABC Films, Swank Motion Pictures, Ross Lipman, Richard Pena, Carl Lumbly, and Cotty Chubb.

The exhibition is made possible by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art.