Together Un/Known

Together Unknown May HTogether Un/Known
Archival Ethics and the Case of Acquisition 6130

Anonymous home movie collections, while not entirely rare, present unique challenges for archives. In the case of Acquisition 6130 at the Academy Film Archive, archivists discovered what appeared to be home movies of a gay interracial couple living in Southern California in the early 1970s.

This presentation will look at the discovery process of the home movies, the passionate pursuit of locating the subjects in the films, and the ethics surrounding the role of the archivist in identifying content, inferring meaning, and ultimately shining a light on the lives (romantic or otherwise) of private citizens. May Haduong of the Academy Film Archive will share video clips from the 8mm and Super 8 home movies to accompany her talk.

May Haduong is the Senior Manager of Public Access at the Academy Film Archive, where she oversees access to the Archive’s Collection. Prior to serving at the Academy Film Archive, she was the Project Manager for the Outfest UCLA Legacy Project for LGBT Moving Image Preservation, a collaboration between the UCLA Film & Television Archive and Outfest, which produces the Los Angeles LGBT Film Festival. She currently serves on the Legacy Project Advisory Committee.

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM
May Haduong Presentation + Q&A
2:45 PM – 3:45 PM
Screening

Together Un/Known takes place March 26, 1:30PM in the IU Libraries Moving Image Archive, Wells 048. 1320 E 10th St, Bloomington, IN 47405.

About BFC/A

The Black Film Center/Archive at Indiana University was established in 1981 as the first archival repository dedicated to collecting, preserving, and making available historically and culturally significant films by and about black people. The BFC/A's primary objectives are to promote scholarship on black film and to serve as an open resource for scholars, researchers, students, and the general public; to encourage creative film activity by independent black filmmakers; and to undertake and support research on the history, impact, theory, and aesthetics of black film traditions. View all posts by BFC/A

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