Julie Dash: IU Celebrates The 25th Anniversary of “Daughters of The Dust.”

Julie Dash’s rich filmography explores the spectrum of Black women’s experience across wide swaths of geography and time. The year 2016 marks the 25th anniversary of her groundbreaking film Daughters of the Dust, and the Black Film Center/Archive is excited to sponsor a screening of the newly released digital restoration, along with a selection of early short films from her time as part of the UCLA-based Black cinema revolution known today as the L.A. Rebellion.

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In the late 1960s, Black students at the UCLA film school began to explore themes beyond the canon. Dash created her earliest short films then, each of which explores different but intersecting aspects of Black womanhood. Four Women (1975) experiments with music, dance and identity; The Diary of an African Nun (1977) contemplates complexities within spiritual relationships; and Illusions (1982) tells the story of a Black woman who passes for white to pursue a career in 1940s Hollywood.

Daughters of the Dust (1991), the first feature film directed by an African American woman to receive theatrical distribution in the U.S., engrosses the viewer in early 20th-century Gullah life. The film follows three generations of Peazant Family women as they prepare to leave the island their ancestors were brought to as slaves over a century earlier for opportunities up north. The lyrical magic-realist qualities of the film meld with historic truths to create a sense of uncommon understanding.(2K DCP Presentation) Director Julie Dash is scheduled to be present at this screening and all other screening events mentioned in the above poster.

For more information regarding this event series, please visit the IU Cinema website.

This series is sponsored by the Black Film Center/Archive, The Media School’s cinema and media arts program, the Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies, and IU Cinema.

About BFC/A

The Black Film Center/Archive at Indiana University was established in 1981 as the first archival repository dedicated to collecting, preserving, and making available historically and culturally significant films by and about black people. The BFC/A's primary objectives are to promote scholarship on black film and to serve as an open resource for scholars, researchers, students, and the general public; to encourage creative film activity by independent black filmmakers; and to undertake and support research on the history, impact, theory, and aesthetics of black film traditions. View all posts by BFC/A

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