Latino Film Festival & Conference at Indiana University

The Latino Film Festival and Conference – a packed three days of film, discussion, and visiting directors and writers – comes to IU from the 5th to the 7th of April.

The festival kicks off with the dystopian border tale Sleep Dealer (2008) and Blacktino (2011), a “dark teen comedy about an overweight half-black, half-latino nerd.”  Sleep Dealer director Alex Rivera will host a Q&A after his film.

A still from Blacktino. Credit: Aaron Burns.

Cuban cinema will leave its mark on the festival with the pairing of Memories of Underdevelopment (1968) and Memories of Overdevelopment (2010) [this five minute trailer is stunning], both based of works by Cuban novelist Edmundo Desnoes, which follow a panel discussion on Cuban cinema in the U.S.  Both Desnoes and Memories of Overdevelopment director Miguel Coyula will be present for a Q&A after their films.

Two other panel discussions will focus on Queer Studies and Latina/o filmmaking as well as migration, labor, and legal status.  Charles Ramirez Berg, of the University of Texas, Austin, will deliver the keynote address Saturday afternoon.

Gun Hill Road (2011) director Rashaad Ernesto Green will be the third director at the festival, for a Q&A after his film.

The BFC/A is one of fifteen entities sponsoring the event, and the screening of Zoot Suit (1981) will be from an archival copy in the BFC/A.

Here is the full schedule  for the festival. All events are free, but ticketed.

 

About BFC/A

The Black Film Center/Archive at Indiana University was established in 1981 as the first archival repository dedicated to collecting, preserving, and making available historically and culturally significant films by and about black people. The BFC/A's primary objectives are to promote scholarship on black film and to serve as an open resource for scholars, researchers, students, and the general public; to encourage creative film activity by independent black filmmakers; and to undertake and support research on the history, impact, theory, and aesthetics of black film traditions. View all posts by BFC/A

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