Spotlight: Black Martial Arts Films

image courtesy: blackdynamitemovie.com

We recently added the 2009 hit blaxploitation parody Black Dynamite to our collection.  One of the trailers on the DVD was for another movie starring Michael Jai White, Blood and Bone.

image courtesy: bloodandbonemovie.com

If you live in the New York area,  you can check out Blood and Bone at the Museum of the Moving Image this Sunday, June 12 at 3pm.  This is part of the museum’s Fist and Sword series, curated by Warrington Hudlin.  The star of Blood and Bone, Michael Jai White, and Ben Ramsey, the film’s director are scheduled to be in attendance.

POSTER DISPLAY

The BFC/A currently has a display of classic black martial arts movie posters in the study area on the ground floor of Wells Library, right outside our entrance.  We’re featuring seven films posters:

That Man Bolt (1973) – “The highest flyin’, slickest, meanest dude you’ll ever face is Jefferson Bolt…on the case.”

Three the Hard Way (1974) – “Action explodes all over the place when the big three join forces to save their race.”

The Black Dragon’s Revenge (1975)

Force Four (1975) – “When things get rough, we get bad!”

Ebony, Ivory & Jade (1976) – “3 Foxy Mama’s Turned Loose…They Call ‘Em Ebony, Ivory & Jade.  The Can Lick Any Man Ever Made!”

Death Dimension (1978) – “That man from ‘Enter the Dragon’ is back to bust you…and then bust you apart!”

The Last Dragon (1985) – “His friends think he’s too serious. His family thinks he’s crazy.  His enemies think he’s no challenge.  But she knows he’s THE LAST DRAGON.’

About BFC/A

The Black Film Center/Archive at Indiana University was established in 1981 as the first archival repository dedicated to collecting, preserving, and making available historically and culturally significant films by and about black people. The BFC/A's primary objectives are to promote scholarship on black film and to serve as an open resource for scholars, researchers, students, and the general public; to encourage creative film activity by independent black filmmakers; and to undertake and support research on the history, impact, theory, and aesthetics of black film traditions. View all posts by BFC/A

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